Monday, July 13, 2009

Great advise from PARENTS magazine!

I just got the new issue of PARENTS and I had to share some of the wonderful things that are in this issue:

The first story really spoke to me....

LOVING YOUR ONE AND ONLY (p. 48) by Sharlene K. Johnson
Forget those negative stereotypes about spoiled, lonely onlies. There's a lot you can do to make sure your kid is a totally happy and well-adjusted.
Only children may learn vocabulary early because they spend a lot of time talking to adults.
The kind of person your child turns into has more to do with your parenting style and a whole variety of other factors than the number of siblings he/she has or doesn't have.
Some famous only children are: ALICIA KEYS, LANCE ARMSTRONG, DANIEL RADCLIFFE, SHAWN JOHNSON, and CONDOLEEZZA RICE.

THE HELICOPTER MOMS NEED TO STOP HOVERING p. 113 by Kim Ratcliff
Constantly swooping in to rescue kids from life's little bumps can keep them from developing the confidence and independence they need to succeed as adults. Back off-and let them soar on their own.
* We simple can't protect our children from everything and we shouldn't try. Shielding a kid from adversity doesn't give them a change to learn to manage conflict on their own-whether it's resolving an argument they have with a friend or dealing with a pilfering playmate.

* Enabling a child to stay attached to you 24/7 squashes his burgeoning independence, inhibits his ability to self-sooth, and prevents hi from acquiring important social skills. If that's not bad enough, it also ruins your chance for time free from parenting duties.

* Kids need your encouragement, and of course they love it when you recognize their achievements. But while praising their hard work helps children develop a strong sense of self, raving over every macaroni-and-glue masterpiece or home run in T-ball can actually sap self-confidence in the long run. It also confuses a child about what's truly noteworthy versus what's simply an age-appropriate milestone.

* You may be creating a child who's clueless as to how to spend a free afternoon in the park. His uber-hectic calendar is probably robbing him of a carefree childhood, as well as compromising quality family time.

* If you do everything to protect your kid from ever feeling unsure of herself, you'll raise a total wimp.

IT'S POTTY TIME p. 116 by Suzanne Schlosberg

I especially liked this one for the 9 SIGNS IT'S TIME she listed:

1. They can easily take off their clothes.
2. Asks to be changed when wet or poopy.
3. Follows you to the bathroom, asks questions and imitates you.
4. Knows their body parts and the words "pee" and "poop."
5. Basically understands what pee and poop are, where they come from, and where they belong.
6. Shows interest in books and videos about using the potty.
7. Stays dry fro at least 2 hours in a row, is dry after naps and ideally, is poop-free overnight.
8. Normally stops an activity when they need to poop.
9. Isn't constipated (has one or two formed stools a day).

WAY COOL on p. 176 has a great idea for a fun and health dessert. Using an ice-cream scoop to get round balls of seedless watermelon, cantaloupe or honeydew, pop them onto mini-ice-cream cones.

Also if you go to the website for PARENTS, they are offering a 2 year subscription FREE.


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